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Ski-Doo

1967 Ski-Doo 494 Rotax

Bombardier never used this 494 in a production Ski-Doo. Roger Langlois, a very successful Ski-Doo racer from Montmagny, Quebec, acquired five 494 engines in 1966. The 494 took championships all over North America during the 1966-67 winter. The 494 also picked up the Eagle River World Championship driven by Duane Frandsen.

 

 

1968 Ski-Doo double twin 600 Rotax

This was Ski Doo's first atempt at a twin engine speed run sled. Here is a little more info on the 600 rotax: In December of 1967, Ski-Doo distributors received a bulletin regarding the Rotax 600cc engine. The bulletin stated that in the near future a limited number of Rotax 600cc engines will be available. It also stated that it was very important that the gear ratio be set up so that the 600cc engine would not turn higher than 6000 rpm's. Under no circumstances should the engine be allowed to rev. up to more than 7000 rpm's. Even if 6000 rpm's seems conservative, if you consider the actual torque curve of the 600 cc there would be no need to set the speed higher than 6000 rpm's. At first it was thought that they would just receive the engine and would install it in the chassis of there choice. The 600cc vertical twin was the first engine Rotax designed especially for Ski-Doo.

 

 

1969 Ski-Doo TNT "Single Eagle" 370 custom
This Ski-Doo and is powered by two Fan cooled 370 Rotax single cylinder engines.

 

 

1969 Ski-Doo Double Eagle 399

This Ski-Doo Double Eagle and is powered by two Fan cooled 399 Rotax twin cylinder engines.

 

 

1969 Ski-Doo Double Eagle 669

This Ski-Doo was called the Double Eagle and is powered by two fan cooled 669 Rotax twin cylinder engines. Driven with great skill and daring by Duane Eck, It captured the world record of over 95 mph. Three of these machines were built

 

 

1970 Ski-Doo Double Eagle 776

The first free air Ski-Doo Double Eagle and is powered by two free air 776 Rotax twin cylinder engines. Driven with great skill and daring by Duane Eck, it was capable of speeds in excess of 100 mph but captured no world records.

 

****Ski-Doo Double Eagle****

 

 

 

1970 Ski-Doo Double Eagle 797

This free air Ski-Doo Double Eagle and is powered by two free air 797 Rotax three cylinder engines. Driven by Gaston Ferland, it was capable of speeds in excess of 100 mph.

 

 

1971 Ski-Doo X-2R

The X-2R is powered by two Rotax 797cc free air triples. The X-2R achived 111.54 mph during the 1971 season, but the following year Yvon Duhamel drove the X-2R to a two run average of 127.3mph. It was finally a world's record for Ski Doo, one that held up for many years to follow.

 

 

****Ski-Doo X-2R****
 

 

 

1971 Ski-Doo X-4R

The 71 X-4R is powered by four older Rotax 776 free air twins. The X-4R driven in less than ideal conditions by Lucien Lamoreaux achieved a speed of 123.43mph in it's best run. In 72 they used four Rotax 797 three cylinder engines and moved the spoiler to the back.

 

****Ski-Doo X-4R****
 

 

 

 

Ski-Doo triple threat

 

 

1972 Ski-Doo X-2R

The X-2R is powered by two Rotax 797cc free air triples. Yvon Duhamel drove the X-2R to a two run average of 127.3mph. It was finally a world's record for Ski Doo, one that held up for many years to follow.

 

 

1972 Ski-Doo Inferno

The Inferno is powered by two Rotax 797 cc free air triples similar to the X-2R but this machine was quite a different beast. Where the X-2R's twin engines were linked to the front drive axle like a conventional sled, the Inferno drove both the front and rear axles, driving the single track from both ends. This was likely the cause for the insurmountable track reliability problems the Inferno suffered. Despite summer time testing that indicated 140mph+ speeds on snow the Inferno disintegrated tracks at speeds in excess of 100 mph. This would be the last factory sponsored speed sled produced by Ski-Doo.

 

****Ski-Doo Inferno****
 

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